drop shadow

The Impossible: ShadedBorder Updated

Well, actually I thought ShadedBorder is kind of discontinued (in favor of LiquidCanvas)... But I proofed myself wrong and here it is: The first update for ShadedBorder since 1.5 years!

It fixes the IE8 1px overlap bug reported by Tony and comes with a performance optimization for every browser supported: The ShadedBorder nodes will only be cloned on demand.

Grab version 0.6.2 now at the ShadedBorder project page.

Liquid Canvas Positioned

I really love user comments like this one from Kaz van Wel:

I'd like to say I really like your Liquid Canvas script, you really made an invention by putting some scripts together and a wrapper around it to make a cross browser solution to round borders and a lot more possibilities :D. I really think this can change the web like Ajax did around 2006, once people know it exists.

Well Kaz, I think so, too: Let's spread the word! :-)

Kaz also brought my attention to a bug in Liquid Canvas: It was basically impossible to put a "liquid-canvased" element into a container with absolute or relative positioning.

ShadedBorder with Gracefull Degradation

Yeah well, it was raining... And I'll be on holiday for quite some days from Tuesday on - without any computer. So this weekend was kind of the perfect time to hack a little bit on my neat little fun project ShadedBorder.

The result: after version 0.3 yesterday, today comes version 0.4. ;-) The new features:

  • Graceful Degradation: If JavaScript is disabled, your page will look almost as good as if ShadedBorder could do its job.

ShadedBorder - JavaScript Round Corners with Drop Shadow

You should also check out my script Liquid Canvas which uses HTML canvas to render rounded corners with drop shadows.

Rounding corners with JavaScript has a long history. Everything started on 16th of March 2005 with Nifty Corners and loads of other libs followed.

Unresponsive Firefox Scripts and RUZEE.Borders

There are quite some complaints and solutions about Firefox displaying annoying "unresponsive JavaScript detected, continue?" messages.

If you have scripts that simply sometimes take longer to do their stuff, you shouldn't however force your visitors to change the default JavaScript "timeout" value as proposed by the tips linked above. You should consider doing parts of your calculations asynchronously and give free the one and only JavaScript execution thread for some milliseconds. Firefox will be happy in this case and won't display the annoying message anymore, even when configured with its default settings.

I did that with the latest version 0.12 of RUZEE.Borders. Let's have a look at the main rendering loop:

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